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The website “Ottoman History” is open for historians, art historians, … who are doing research on all different aspects of Ottoman History and its manifestations in Europe (prints, art, diplomatic relations, theatre, etc.).  The purpose is to publish interesting points of view, small articles, open up discussions on Ottoman History. The interpretation of the concept Ottoman history is rather open. It can be in relation to other cultures e.g. European culture, the Iranian culture, etc.  
Connected to this website is the Linkedin group “Ottoman history”. The idea of this group is to work on a network to exchange ideas and ultimately make publications together or meet in conferences.

GENDER AND DIPLOMACY: WOMEN AND MEN IN EUROPEAN AND OTTOMAN EMBASSIES FROM THE 15TH TO THE 18TH CENTURY

  

A window into the past: Turks and Greeks at the end of the Ottoman Empire

LectureA window into the past: Turks and Greeks at the end of the Ottoman Empire
Dr. Emre Erol
Date 16 March 2016

Time 17:30 -19:00 hrs.

Address 

Lipsius Building

Cleveringaplaats 1

2311 BD Leiden

Room 148

Slightly more than a hundred years ago some parts of the Middle East were much more diverse then they are today. Peoples from different ethnicities, religions and linguistic groups lived together in the rather cosmopolitan port towns and port cities of the Eastern Mediterranean. The Western Anatolian seaboard, or the Aegean shores of today’s Turkey was among such cosmopolitan regions.
Most of those once diverse towns and cities of the region are gone today. What was life like before the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in a major Aegean port town? How did Greeks (then Ottoman Orthodox Christians or Rum) and Turks (then Muslims) live at the time? How did a predominantly Turkish modern nation state like the Republic of Turkey emerged out of that past?
Presented in collaboration with the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation, this lecture discusses these questions based on a recent book by Dr. Emre Erol that opens a window into the Western Anatolian seaboard of the Ottoman Empire at the turn of the century. It will discuss global issues of the time such as the incorporation with the world markets, influence of nationalisms, wars and migration in relation to the regional history of the Aegean. It will also draw parallels to the current processes of transformation in the Middle East and discuss the relevance of history in understanding them. The lecture is open to public participation and it will be followed by a Q&A session.
Registration

Please send an e-mail to info@ihjr.org to register for this event.

A window into the past: Turks and Greeks at the end of the Ottoman Empire

LectureA window into the past: Turks and Greeks at the end of the Ottoman Empire
Dr. Emre Erol
Date 16 March 2016

Time 17:30 -19:00 hrs.

Address 

Lipsius Building

Cleveringaplaats 1

2311 BD Leiden

Room 148

Slightly more than a hundred years ago some parts of the Middle East were much more diverse then they are today. Peoples from different ethnicities, religions and linguistic groups lived together in the rather cosmopolitan port towns and port cities of the Eastern Mediterranean. The Western Anatolian seaboard, or the Aegean shores of today’s Turkey was among such cosmopolitan regions.
Most of those once diverse towns and cities of the region are gone today. What was life like before the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in a major Aegean port town? How did Greeks (then Ottoman Orthodox Christians or Rum) and Turks (then Muslims) live at the time? How did a predominantly Turkish modern nation state like the Republic of Turkey emerged out of that past?
Presented in collaboration with the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation, this lecture discusses these questions based on a recent book by Dr. Emre Erol that opens a window into the Western Anatolian seaboard of the Ottoman Empire at the turn of the century. It will discuss global issues of the time such as the incorporation with the world markets, influence of nationalisms, wars and migration in relation to the regional history of the Aegean. It will also draw parallels to the current processes of transformation in the Middle East and discuss the relevance of history in understanding them. The lecture is open to public participation and it will be followed by a Q&A session.
Registration

Please send an e-mail to info@ihjr.org to register for this event.

Triumphal celebrations in Brussels (1686)

In September 1686 Brussels was the scenery of triumphal celebrations organised by Prince Eugene Alexander of Thurn and Taxis (1652-1714) and the Spanish Habsburg governor Francisco Antonio de Agurta, marquis of Castanaga (1640 – 1702). After being 150 years in possession of the Ottomans, Buda, the Hungarian capital, was conquered by the Habsburg Austrian emperor, Leopold I (1640 – 1705). This highly symbolic victory at Buda on the Ottomans was celebrated throughout the Habsburg empire and beyond. The Dutch printer and artist Romeyn de Hooghe (1645 – 1708) covered the celebrations in Brussels in a set of engravings. These printed engravings tell a unique story how the Brussels public sphere experienced and celebrated the conquest of Buda by the Habsburgs with a distinct portrayal of the Ottomans. The textual and iconographic analysis of these prints and engravings with the different stages of the celebrations forms the base of the following article:

Van Waelderen, D.G. (2013). Feest in Brussel na de inname van de stad Buda in 1686. De analyse van een politiek prentenverhaal van Romeyn de Hooghe. De Achttiende Eeuw, 45 (2).

Post Graduate Seminar on the Ottomans

Invitation to the Post Graduate Seminar  at KU Leuven and presentation of PhD research:

The portrayal of the Ottomans in the Spanish and Austrian Netherlands of the Habsburgs: media, opinions and images.

Enbach – Baroque bodies

The Ottomans amongst other subjects in the Conference of European Network of Baroque Cultural Heritage .

The programme of the conference: Preliminary Programme V 2 2012-07-31

The Turk in Early Modern Europe

In the first conference session of the Nordic Network for Renaissance Studies there will be a section about: The Turk in Early Modern Europe. More information on: http://nnrs.ku.dk/documents/Inaugural_Conference_for.pdf/